The most comprehensive survey of Sir Norman Foster’s works ever

We’d planned yesterday to visit the exhibitions of works by two architectural giants held in Roppongi, Tokyo, Sir Norman Foster and Frank Gehry, but we made it to only the former, because the latter museum location was closed.

Above are some of Sir Norman Foster’s better known works: The German Parliament building, the British Museum courtyard and the Renault Distribution Center.
More than merely a parade of skyscrapers (below)…

Sir Foster tackled an amazing array of projects, showing tremendous versatility as well as diversity of forms and styles.

Government buildings,  libraries, residences, pavilions, biodomes, museums, airports, warehouses… he built them all.

Some of his works, like the structure at St Moritz was the spectacular backdrop scene in the latest James Bond flick, Spectre

image image

image

Some of the projects are astonishingly outlandish and involve designing residences in wasteland landscapes, on the moon and on Mars.

Below: Models of infrastructure and transportation projects were seen a-plenty…

… but planned mega-city projects ahead, particularly in Saudi Arabia and Stockholm are expected to be especially spectacular and to embody all that is Scifi and futuristic.

The exhibits were displayed in the Mori Art Museum’s observatory somehow fittingly framed by the panoramic views of Tokyo’s cityscape.
image

image
The exhibition is billed as the most comprehensive survey ever made of Sir Norman Foster’s works. Many of his other works were also featured in smaller photo displays, creatively mapped out on a 3D globe, so that we could see just how global his architectural firm (the largest in the U.K.) is.
image
Finally, we see the man himself, Sir Norman Foster beside one of his early works.

image

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Personal Growth

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s