HOMEMADE SPORTS DRINKS RECIPES

Sports drinks: How to make your own
July 21, 2011|By Julie Deardorff, Tribune Newspapers

To make your own sports drink, start with lemons or another citrus fruit. (Chicago…)
It’s easier than you might think to concoct your own sports drink. The refueling beverages need to provide three things: water, electrolytes (especially sodium) and carbohydrates, said registered dietitian Dawn Jackson Blatner.

Electrolytes are essential minerals, including sodium and potassium, that regulate heart beat and blood pressure. When we sweat, we lose sodium and chloride (salt) and to a lesser degree, potassium, magnesium and calcium, said Blatner.

Milk has electrolytes, but “chocolate milk is used more as a recovery drink since it has protein and carbohydrates to repair muscle and replenish energy stores,” Blatner said. “A sports drink is more for before and during exercise to replenish energy stores to keep our muscles running.”

Still, the best sports drink for most athletes, with the exception of endurance or distance competitors, is good old fashioned water, said registered dietitian Dave Grotto. His mock sports drink consists of a lemon juice, a splash of fruit juice or a 1/2 teaspoon of honey and a dash of salt per one cup of water.

Or, try coconut water, which is said to deliver as much as 12 times the electrolytes of sports drinks. “Buy an unsweetened version like Zico. Jazz it up by adding chilled green tea and mango juice or a drizzle of honey,” suggests Wholeliving.com.

Here are a few other ideas:

Blatner’s homemade Gatorade:

3 1/2 cups water

1/2 cup orange juice

2 1/2 tablespoons honey

1/4 teaspoon salt.

Makes four servings. Per 8 ounce serving: 50 calories, 14 grams carbohydrate, 160 milligrams sodium.

Homemade sports drink from “Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook.” It’s also available on her new app: Recipies for Athletes.

1/4 cup sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup hot water

1/4 cup orange juice (not concentrate) plus 2 tablespoons lemon juice

3 1/2 cups cold water

1. In the bottom of a pitcher, dissolve the sugar and salt in the hot water.

2. Add the juice and the remaining water; chill.

3. Quench that thirst!

Makes 1 quart. per 8-ounce serving: 50 calories, 12 grams carbohydrate, 110 mg sodium.

Clark encourages creativity when making your own sports drink. “For example, you can dilute many combinations of juices (such as cranberry + lemonade) to 50 calories per 8 ounces and then add a pinch of salt. (More precisely, ¼ teaspoon salt per 1 quart of liquid,)” she wrote.

:::

Homemade sports drinks by Dr Lorraine Williams the “Track Mom”

Gatorade has a formulation that gives the following for an 8oz serving:
14grams Carbohydrate (5.9%)
110 mg Sodium
30mg Potassium
52 calories
Assuming that is a pretty good formula, we can get close by using one of the following recipes:

Homemade Sports Drink Recipe #1
10 tbs. sugar (5/8 cups or 120 grams)
.75 tsp Sea salt (4.2 grams) or Morton’s lite
1 package of unsweetened Koolade mix for flavor
Water to make 2 liters
The recipe will give a total of 124 grams of solute which in 2 liters water gives a total of 6.2% concentration. For an 8 oz serving this gives:
14.2 grams carbohydrate (6%)
53 calories
103 mg Sodium
121 mg Potassium
You’ll notice that the amount of potassium is quite a bit higher than Gatorade, but the rest is pretty close. If you wanted to reduce the potassium, another option would be to use 1/2 tsp. each of regular sea salt and the Morton Lite Salt. This would change it to:
104mg sodium
40mg potassium
Homemade Sports Drink Recipe #2
If you wanted to reduce the amount of potassium, or simply didn’t want to buy some Morton Lite Salt, here is another option.
1/2 cup orange juice
9 tbs. Sugar
3/8 tsp Salt
Water to 2 liters

Homemade Sports Drinks: Lower Cost, Same Nutrition As Store-Bought
By NANCY CLARK, Mom’s Team
Homemade Sports Drink Recipes Nutrition Sports Hydration
Commercial sports drinks contain between 50 to 70 calories per 8 ounces, with about 110 milligrams sodium.
You can make a homemade sports drink with the same nutritional profile by using the following recipe but at a much lower cost than expensive store-bought sports drinks.
Ingredients

1/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup hot water
1/4 cup orange juice (not concentrate)
2 tablespoons lemon juice (optional, but flavor will be weaker)*
3 1/2 cups cold water
Directions
Dissolve the sugar and salt in the hot water at the bottom of a pitcher.
Add the juice and the cold water;
Chill.
Quench that thirst!
Yield: 1 quart
Nutrition Information:

Total calories: 200
Calories per 8 ounces: 50
Carbohydrate 12 grams
Sodium 110 mg
Create Your Own
You can be creative when making your own sports drink. For example, you can dilute many combinations of juices (such as cranberry + lemonade) to 50 calories per 8 ounces and then add a pinch of salt (¼ teaspoon salt per 1 quart of liquid).
Some people use flavorings such as sugar-free lemonade to enhance the flavor yet keep the calories in the 50 to 70 calories per 8-ounce range.
The trick is to always test the recipe during training, not during an important event. You want to be sure it tastes good when your child is hot and sweaty and that it settles well in her stomach when she’s working hard.

David Hay’s recipes

Gatorade ™ has worked hard to come up with what they feel is a good balance of carbohydrates and electrolytes for extended physical activity. Most researchers agree that the optimal concentration of carbohydrates in a sports drink is about 6%. This concentration actually allows the water to be absorbed more quickly in the body than plain water alone. I don’t think we need to use sports drinks. I don’t use them unless I’m doing a run that going to be over 90 minutes long. However, for long runs, the water, electrolytes, and carbohyrdates help a lot.

Gatorade has a formulation that gives the following for an 8oz serving:
14grams Carbohydrate (5.9%)
110 mg Sodium
30mg Potassium
52 calories
Assuming that is a pretty good formula, we can get close by using one of the following recipes:

Recipe #1

10 tbs. sugar (5/8 cups or 120 grams)
.75 tsp Morton Lite salt (4.2 grams)
1 package of unsweetened Coolade mix for flavor
Water to make 2 liters
The recipe will give a total of 124 grams of solute which in 2 liters water gives a total of 6.2% concentration. For an 8 oz serving this gives:
14.2 grams carbohydrate (6%)
53 calories
103 mg Sodium
121 mg Potassium
You’ll notice that the amount of potassium is quite a bit higher than Gatorade, but the rest is pretty close. If you wanted to reduce the potassium, another option would be to use 1/2 tsp. each of regular salt and the Morton Lite Salt. This would change it to:
104mg sodium
40mg potassium

Recipe #2

If you wanted to reduce the amount of potassium, or simply didn’t want to buy some Morton Lite Salt, here is another option.

1/2 cup orange juice
9 tbs. Sugar
3/8 tsp Salt
Water to 2 liters

This gives, per an 8 oz serving:
14.4 grams carb (6.1%)
104 mg sodium
28.4 mg Potassium

I believe that you could substitute 2 tbs. of lemon juice for the orange juice and it would come out the same (or at least close).

:::
Hydration Fruit-Ade recipes for 2 quarts (64 oz).
Fruit juices vary widely in the amounts of sugar that they contain. Read the Nutrition Facts on the label of your juice to learn how much sugar it contains per 8 oz serving. Then use the table below to dilute your choice of fruit juice to the exact sugar level that is needed in a sports drink. Add stevia or other sugar-free sweeteners or flavor enhancers if needed.
sugar per 8 oz serving
amount juice
amount water
amount salt
8g
64 oz
0 oz
1/4 tsp
12g
43 oz
21 oz
1/4 tsp
16g
32 oz
32 oz
1/4 tsp
24g
21 oz
43 oz
1/4 tsp
32g
16 oz
48 oz
1/4 tsp
40g
13 oz
51 oz
1/4 tsp
48g
11 oz
53 oz
1/4 tsp

• See also: PowerT Hydration Juice – adding tea to the Fruit-Ade recipe makes a great energy drink!!

Hydration Lemon-Ade & Hydration Lime-Ade recipes for 2 quarts or 1 gallon.
Bottled lemon and lime juices are readily available in our grocery stores. These contain little or no sugar, so sugar must be added to make the hydration drink.
2 Quarts: 2 quarts water, 1/4 cup sugar, 1/4 tsp Morton Lite Salt, 1/2 cup lemon or lime juice.
1 Gallon: 4 quarts water, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 tsp Morton Lite Salt, 1 cup lemon or lime juice.
Home version: no salt & no sugar added, just sweeten to taste with stevia.

Hydration Fruit-Ade – Home Version.
Whenever I’m not intensely exercising I don’t need a drink with the electrolytes from the salt. I use this “home version” for hydration when driving home from whitewater paddleboating trips, and when I am inactive at home and at work. Many brands of fruit juices diluted in the Fruit-Ade recipe provide a light and refreshing drink that I like even better than the juice concentration provided by the manufacturer.
2 Quarts: Use the Hydration Fruit-Ade recipe above, but delete the salt

Source: http://brt-insights.blogspot.jp/2009/09/hydration-fruit-ade-natural-fruit.html

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